Tag Archives: ArcGIS Pro

Space and Time Cluster Analysis – Can ArcGIS help predict the future?

Everything happens at a place and occurs at some point in time. Space time analysis seeks to understand when and where (and sometimes why) things occur. With the evolution of ArcGIS Pro we now have the opportunity to not only successfully analyse patterns of time and space, but also immerse in a deep 3D visual experience.

ArcGIS allows you to exploit the space and time aspects of your data, allowing you to answer questions like:

  1. Is there an emerging hot spot?
  2. Are there any anomalies?
  3. Where your decisions or resource allocations effective?

Several tools, including Create Space Time Cubes, Cluster and Outlier Analysis, Emerging Hot Sport Analysis and Grouping Analysis assist with answering these difficult questions. So, let’s explore how we can utilise some these tools to analyse earthquakes that have occurred across South Australia. The quake data was sourced online from Geoscience Australia as a csv, recording the last 58 years of earthquakes across the State. Which I then subsequently created a feature class.

space-time

Viewing space time cube in ArcGIS Pro

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ArcGIS Pro: Lets be animated!

ArcGIS Pro is one of Esri’s new desktop mapping application. With ArcGIS Pro we have the ability to represent and display our spatial information in new and exciting ways. I thought I would spend a minute stepping you through animation in ArcGIS Pro. ArcGIS Pro’s animation toolset allows users to create visually exciting products, as the animation tools can be used in either a 2D map or 3D scene.

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Heard of Conda? Wondering how it relates to using Python in ArcGIS Pro (version 1.3)?

apro1-3After installing ArcGIS Pro 1.3, you may notice a few changes. The scope of this blog will detail Conda – what it is? why this change occurred? and how conda has affected the usage of ArcGIS Desktop functionality when used by ArcGIS Pro? – specifically as at version 1.3 (and later releases).

For those reading, I am assuming your understanding of python is that when used in both ArcGIS 10.x and ArcGIS Pro, this is the primary language to automate, configure and consume your GIS ecosystem. One of the cornerstones within each ecosystem is knowing Continue reading

Australia is on the move GDA2020

Recently in the Australian media there has been a lot of commentary around the impending update to Australia’s primary datum. From GDA94 to GDA2020. It has even made the British media http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36912700.

At Esri Australia this has prompted a lot of questions from clients in regards to the support of the new datum GDA2020 in ArcGIS. Will ArcGIS support GDA2020 and when will ArcGIS support GDA2020?

Before we start to answer these questions I think it is important we understand exactly what the new datum is and why Geoscience Australia is moving towards a new datum.

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ArcGIS Pro 1.2 Licensing update

Welcome to the new licensing model for ArcGIS Pro 1.2. With the recent release of ArcGIS Pro 1.2 users can now choose which license model they wish to use to authorize ArcGIS Pro. Your organisation can now choose between the default Named User model, or you can now convert your ArcGIS Pro entitlements to Single Use or Concurrent Use licenses.

As most ArcGIS users know, with a new release comes new functions and ArcGIS Pro 1.2 is no different. Many of you know that ArcGIS Pro 1.x has been managed using either ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS to allocate licenses to a Named Users. With ArcGIS Pro 1.2 users are now able to convert their ArcGIS Pro license from a Named User to either a Single Use or Concurrent Use license.

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Mapping Mars with ArcGIS Pro

I only discovered relatively recently that the Desktop suite is not limited to mapping Earth. Hidden amongst the thousands of coordinate systems available, you can find those for mapping planets within the Solar System.

Just for kicks, I downloaded all the geological data from Mars to have a look in ArcGIS Pro and see how it would fare in the hybrid 2D/3D interface.

You can try this out for yourselves by downloading the data from the USGS here. The datasets are conveniently provided in a file geodatabase and the layers come with some standard symbology in MXDs, so it’s an easy feat to import into ArcGIS Pro.

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