Tag Archives: ArcGIS for Desktop

A HIDDEN GEM: How to convert MapInfo files (.MIF, .MID) into Esri’s shape files using ArcGIS for Desktop

The aim of this blog is to share with you a somewhat hidden workflow that easily allows any ArcGIS for Desktop user to convert MapInfo file formats. The MapInfo Interchange Formats in question here are (i) the .MIF file, which contains the graphics or actual points that represent the objects, and (ii) the .MID file, which contains any corresponding textual information about the objects.

For anyone that has needed to convert MapInfo file formats into Esri’s shape file format, for use in the multitude of ArcGIS workflows; then you would know this process may have involved any of the following:

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2016: The Year of the Parcel Fabric

One of the many new additions to ArcMap 10 was the introduction of Parcel Editor. Some of you may remember this as a replacement for the Survey Analyst Cadastral Editor product. With this new addition the cadastral fabric dataset was replaced with the new parcel fabric. At the time many just looked at this with a passing interest, especially those with cadastral systems already in place.

So why should 2016 be the year of the Parcel Fabric for you? Here are my top three reasons why it should be. Continue reading

Maps with Style in just a few clicks

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One of the most time consuming processes of map making is deciding how to communicate the intended message of your map and make it look good at the same time. Join us for a session on map making tips and tricks across three ArcGIS applications as we show you how to declutter and represent your intended information using a series of built-in automated tools and effects. Continue reading

Wondering how to use Python with ArcGIS? Esri Australia have courses that can help

Learning how to complete your ArcGIS Geoprocessing steps using Python will allow you to reduce the time spent on complex and/or repetitive tasks and will enable your staff to learn a more productive and dynamic pathway to return results.

So the question is; which course is for you?

The Introduction to Geoprocessing Scripts Using Python (10.2) course will teach you how to create Python scripts to automate tasks related to data management, feature editing, geoprocessing and analysis, and map production using ArcGIS. You will also learn how to share your Python scripts so your key GIS workflows are accessible to others. This course is designed for GIS analysts, specialists, data processors, and others who want to automate ArcGIS tasks and workflows.

After completing this course, you will be able to: Continue reading

Go Pro with ArcGIS for Desktop!

Esri Inc. has recently announced the release of the ArcGIS Pro, the latest addition to the ArcGIS for Desktop product family.

ArcGIS Pro raises desktop GIS to a new level by providing the GIS professional with both the essential and the advanced tools to create, manage and analyse geospatial data in 2d and 3D.

At this stage, the new ArcGIS Pro application is available to all ArcGIS for Desktop users. Once downloaded users can test the beta version of the application and contribute to the official Beta program.

ArcGIS Pro represents a seamless environment for data management, editing and analysis. Users can organise their work into projects and use the geospatial data which is stored locally or access the contents shared via ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS.

ArcGIS Pro comes as a full 64-bit application, which supports multi-threading and has a convenient user interface, which provides users with an instant access to the tools, database connections and allows to quickly switch from a 2D map to a 3-dimensional GIS scene.

Don’t worry if you already have ArcGIS for Desktop installed on your computer; ArcGIS Pro is not intended to replace ArcGIS for Desktop. That’s just another powerful tool that Esri provide you with to get the maximum from your GIS data. You can install ArcGIS Pro Beta on the same machine as ArcGIS for Desktop 10.2.x and run these two software packages in parallel.

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LAS2DEM: Creating raster DEMs and DSMs from *.LAS (Lidar) files in ArcGIS 10.2

Imagery and remote sensing has always been one of my areas of interest in GIS. As a support analyst at Esri Australia I get a large number of imagery-related questions and I often help clients learn how to process their geospatial imagery and LiDAR data in ArcGIS.

Lidar (or Light Detection and Ranging) technology has become very popular and accessible in recent years. Because it provides high resolution elevation data, it’s now extensively used in the GIS world for mapping, spatial analysis and 3D visualization.

Although Lidar data can be used in many of the ArcGIS Desktop software,  it turns out that many users are not aware of some basic workflows that can be utilized to extract raster Digital Elevation Models from their LAS point clouds in ArcGIS.

The question “how do I create a DEM from my Lidar data” is one of the most frequently asked questions when it comes to imagery related queries or support incidents.  So I decided to prepare a quick overview of tools and methods that you can use to extract raster surfaces from your Lidar (*.las) files.

Below, I will outline the methods to extract the DEMs (Digital Elevation Model, also referred to as bare earth) and DSMs (Digital Surface Model, which is the first return surface which contains buildings, tree canopy etc.). Let’s get into it!!

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Rinse and Repeat! Working with Modelbuilder Iterators

 

Modelbuilder is often an afterthought to most GIS analysts, however, it can be a powerful tool when it comes to building and replicating complex workflows, as well as automating those boring, tedious tasks.

Iterators are unique to models, and allow you to loop through a process on unique values, tables, layers in your map document, or even workspaces.

Let’s have a look at iterators, and how you can use them.

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