Tag Archives: ArcGIS Online

Creating 3D Story Maps using data from Esri CityEngine.

In the last couple of years Story Maps have become quite popular with ArcGIS Desktop / Online users. They provide a quick and efficient way to deliver important information or a message in a form of an easily-configurable web application that uses geographic data and can be enriched by adding various types of media content. There are thousands of story maps that you can access through ArcGIS online and it’s very easy to create your own.

One of my areas of expertise is 3D GIS and from time to time people ask me whether it’s possible to display 3D information in a Story Map. Well, the answer is yes. This functionality has been available for more than a year and I believe it’s time to write a blog about the workflow that will make your story maps 3D –enabled.

In this blog I will demonstrate how to use CityEngine 3D scenes to publish your 3D data to ArcGIS Online and create an interactive Story Map that uses 3D web scenes.

For the purpose of this demo, I used one of the CityEngine Examples provided by Esri Inc. on their CityEngine Gallery web page, available here:>>

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Using Fiddler to Troubleshoot ArcConundrums

My work in our Technical Support team here at Esri Australia has exposed me to a variety of web traffic related incidents. You can find many useful resources to track and disseminate this web traffic online, but I have found one (free) program to be more useful and intuitive than the rest – Fiddler. Fiddler is a fantastic tool that provides information on any web interaction within your ArcGIS Enterprise system, web mapping and mobile applications. This can empower you with a better understanding of your problem, deployment or user workflows.This post will not explore the ins and outs of Fiddler, as this has been well documented by a large and involved community (including Esri), but I would like to introduce you to an easy and tangible way you can look ‘under the hood of web GIS.

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A Brief Look at the Query and Search Widget for Web AppBuilder

While delivering Arc 2: Essential Workflows, I was enthusiastically describing the wonders and practical uses of the search widget in the Web App Builder for ArcGIS Online or Portal and the capability it has to search content within your feature layers. When asking my students, “which widget should I use?” Some referred to the functionality of the query widget which I had previously demonstrated, while others preferred the power of a search widget. Hopefully by the end of this post you will be well placed to make an informed decision as to whether you should use and configure a query or search widget for your web apps in ArcGIS Online or Portal.

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Introducing: ArcGIS Online – smart mapping

Smart mapping emerged with this year’s March release of ArcGIS Online, providing a smarter, more sophisticated approach to symbolising data. Replacing the formerly available ‘change symbols’ option, smart mapping is available to a variety of ArcGIS Online layer types (feature services, dynamic layers, stream services and CSV, SHP and GPX map added data, to name a few), and is accessed via a layer’s change style control () in the map viewer contents display.

The smart mapping toolset presents logical symbology options to the ArcGIS Online map maker. These options are derived based on a subject layer’s characteristics, the data type (point, line or polygon), as well as the spatial distribution of the layer’s features together with the variation of values across a subject display field.

Additionally, other evident display characteristics are assessed, such as symbology used by an underlying basemap. Consequently aesthetic, meaningful and size appropriate symbology options are proposed in this data driven, ‘smart’ approach to layer symbolisation.

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Tips for Sharing Content in Seconds

Directions LIVE

Sharing Content in Seconds is the last session in our technical program for DirectionsLIVE, and this is definitely a case of last, but not least! This session will reinforce the concepts presented in the rest of the program, and give you some tips that you can start using immediately.

If you’re involved in any kind of major event or natural disaster – as an ArcGIS user – you know your information products are in high demand, and critical to decision making.  In this scenario, we’ll look at Rapid Damage Assessment following a Cyclone Event.

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