Tag Archives: ozri

Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Survey 123 & ArcGIS Earth – New Apps to help you do more with ArcGIS

I’ll let you in on a little secret – I was pretty happy when I found out what I’d be presenting at Ozri this year  – it meant I would get to spend some quality time with new two apps!  Over the course of the conference, I delivered a couple of sessions to introduce you to these apps that will help you do more with the ArcGIS Platform.

ArcGIS isn’t just for the geo-geek anymore, we want everyone in your organisation to benefit from Web GIS.  Simple, focused apps can provide a way for you to connect and support a different profile of user in your organisation – perhaps your customer – who may not have specific GIS skills.

If you didn’t get a chance to attend these sessions – here are the highlights!

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Tips and tricks for ArcGIS for Desktop

With ArcGIS for Desktop being such a complete piece of software with tools to suit a diverse range of professions, it’s easy to see how those of you new to GIS and Esri can quickly become daunted by all the options available. This is what today’s session was all about. With Richard and myself being able to combine our years of experience as ArcGIS for Desktop users we could give those of you new to the software, and even those with some more experience, a few of our favourite little tips. And hopefully you can take this knowledge away with you to improve some of your day-to-day workflows.

Top tips and tricks for ArcGIS Desktop

If you weren’t able to attend the session, here are some of the key highlights:

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Automating data updates using Geoprocessing

Today Craig Carpenter and myself have presented on geoprocessing in ArcGIS.

I think one of the challenges in any automation exercise is understanding exactly what the desired outcomes are and the most optimal method to achieve these results. If you know what the end game is, the detail can often take care of itself.

In this session the goal has been to highlight how you can use both model builder and Python scripting to perform structural changes and repetitive tasks against geodatabases. With the final outcome being reusable script which can be run automatically at a desired time without manual interaction.

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Web AppBuilder: Build your first widget in 15 minutes

Hi all,

This afternoon I presented ‘Web AppBuilder: Build your first widget in 15 minutes’.  I packed a lot of info into those fifteen minutes so I thought it’d be worthwhile to provide you with a recap and links to several of the resources I mentioned.

I began by briefly explaining what Web AppBuilder is.  If you aren’t familiar with the versions of Web AppBuilder available through ArcGIS Online and Portal for ArcGIS, I’d recommend having a look at the Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS webpage before diving into custom development with the Developer Edition. Those versions aren’t extensible but it’s good to know what you can do without customisation before beginning to write code – for many applications, the widgets provided out-of-the-box will get the job done.

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Getting your data noticed – Essential mapping apps

Len Olyott and I presented Essential mapping apps for geocentric organisations, it was a great presentation to deliver because it covered five key apps that can help you get your information out into your organisation and beyond, which is important, because the GIS is a system of record and a key platform and you want it to deliver value.

As I was working on the presentation it really brought back the eternal question – how do we value the GIS in our organisation? By the number of data sets held? The number of maps requested? Or perhaps even the value of the real world items represented in the datasets? All good measures. But what about the business value of getting the data out to a wider audience – even an audience that didn’t know they could get to the data, let alone access it in a way that meets their needs.

So there you are working away, constantly delivering an existing GIS capability to your organisation. All around you the field staff, client teams, customer services staff, managers and executives are all busily delivering to their customers as best they can using your maps and data, but they need more – more access to data and maps, and they need it on their smart device, and they want it from you.

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Real-time GIS

Thanks to everyone who attended the real-time GIS session this afternoon. It was great to see the level of interest in the GeoEvent Extension and the options it opens up for organisations to connect the ArcGIS platform with what’s happening in the real world.

We started at the end by showing a complete real-time application built using Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS, which showed vehicles around a fire event in north-western Victoria earlier this year. As the vehicles moved around we picked up their location, course and speed in the GeoEvent Extension, and performed a range of filtering and processing operations on the fly to assist us in our decision-making around this replay of what was a real event back in January.

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Ozri 2015 GIS Generations

Image processing remotely with ENVI

In the world of remote sensing, everything is big. The datasets provided by your preferred image supplier are shipped to you on one or many big disks. To view these image datasets you need a powerful workstation with large amounts of CPU, large amounts of RAM, and always a very good graphics card. Then, when you come to process the imagery, unless you are doing a small area analysis, it takes a long time as each pixel has to be analysed.

In the past our satellite images have had moderate resolution. Landsat presented us with 30m pixels, SPOT 6m pixels and WorldView-2 2m pixels. With the release of WorldView-3, the resolution has again increased. We can acquire multi-spectral satellite imagery at 1m resolution. Initially, this has been seen as a great advancement in remote sensing technology, but with the great gains there is a downside. The size of the disk required to supply the same size image as WorldView-2 has increased exponentially, and the time to process these new images has also increased.

This methodology of bringing the image to the application to process is becoming less viable. It is becoming more expensive in terms of the hardware required, and time-consuming for the image processing. The thought practice now is instead of bringing the image to the processor, why not take the processor to the image. Enter the world of the Cloud.
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