Author Archives: Ivan E.

About Ivan E.

Russia-born geographer with a degree in Cartography and GIS with a 18-year Esri-related experience. Had been working for Esri Russia (CIS) then moved to Australia to join Esri Australia as support trainer in the Professional services dept. Area of expertise: ArcGIS Desktop software, 3D modelling (CityEngine), cartography, remote sensing

Creating 3D Story Maps using data from Esri CityEngine.

In the last couple of years Story Maps have become quite popular with ArcGIS Desktop / Online users. They provide a quick and efficient way to deliver important information or a message in a form of an easily-configurable web application that uses geographic data and can be enriched by adding various types of media content. There are thousands of story maps that you can access through ArcGIS online and it’s very easy to create your own.

One of my areas of expertise is 3D GIS and from time to time people ask me whether it’s possible to display 3D information in a Story Map. Well, the answer is yes. This functionality has been available for more than a year and I believe it’s time to write a blog about the workflow that will make your story maps 3D –enabled.

In this blog I will demonstrate how to use CityEngine 3D scenes to publish your 3D data to ArcGIS Online and create an interactive Story Map that uses 3D web scenes.

For the purpose of this demo, I used one of the CityEngine Examples provided by Esri Inc. on their CityEngine Gallery web page, available here:>>

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Spatial Join’s hidden trick or how to transfer attribute values in a One to Many relationship

From time to time, even the experienced GIS users (my 17 years in GIS allow me to call myself one) come across hidden tools and workflows that have existed in ArcGIS for Desktop for ages, but have never been used.

Recently, a couple of my clients asked me how to solve the following problem. Imagine you had a polygon feature class representing cadastral boundaries (i.e. properties) and another one representing zones (i.e. zoning). One property can fall within several adjacent zoning polygons, which effectively defines the cardinality (or the type of the relationships between features in both datasets) as One to Many (Properties to Zones).

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Tips and Tricks for ArcGIS Pro users

With the final ArcGIS 10.3 release sitting in your My Esri portal, I thought it’d be a good idea to quickly recap a few interesting features about ArcGIS Pro 1.0 you may be yet to come across.

If you haven’t heard, ArcGIS Pro is a new Desktop GIS which will be released as an integral part of the 10.3 suite, and in this chain of blogs we’ve already covered a few topics about ArcGIS Pro, including, and some of the common problems that users can encounter while moving from ArcGIS Pro Beta to ArcGIS Pro 1.0 final.

I hope the few tips I’ve listed below will help you to get started with ArcGIS Pro 1.0 and take advantage of its functionality!

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ArcGIS Pro 1.0. Resolving issues with licensing and transitioning from Beta to v 1.0

ArcGIS Pro was made available for Beta testing in May 2014. That initial release was called Beta 1 and since that time Esri users have participated in an extensive beta testing exercise, which helped the software developer to fix bugs, add new functions and prepare the new ArcGIS Pro software to be released as an integral part of the brand new ArcGIS 10.3 suite.

The latest beta version that the users have been testing up until last week was ArcGIS Pro Beta 5 and the final set of Beta licenses expired on the 17th of November 2014. If you’re currently experiencing problems with launching ArcGIS Pro or signing in to ArcGIS Pro using your ArcGIS Online (AGOL) account, it is likely that you might need to either replace ArcGIS Pro Beta with ArcGIS Pro 1.0 or you need to update the licenses on your ArcGIS Online for Organizations account.

Let’s consider both scenarios.

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Learn 3D with CityEngine!

In response to the growing demand in providing education and training to interested users around Esri’s cutting edge 3D software tool CityEngine, Esri Australia’s training team has recently developed a new training course- CityEngine 2014.

This training course has been designed to provide students who are about to begin constructing realistic models of 3D cities with some foundational knowledge of how CityEngine works, and how to use it to create models, import GIS data and publish their results on ArcGIS Online.

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The CityEngine 2014 training course will also be of interest to those who are already CityEngine users, and have made their first steps in navigating this advanced 3D modelling software, guided by Esri Inc’s tutorials and exercises.

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Go Pro with ArcGIS for Desktop!

Esri Inc. has recently announced the release of the ArcGIS Pro, the latest addition to the ArcGIS for Desktop product family.

ArcGIS Pro raises desktop GIS to a new level by providing the GIS professional with both the essential and the advanced tools to create, manage and analyse geospatial data in 2d and 3D.

At this stage, the new ArcGIS Pro application is available to all ArcGIS for Desktop users. Once downloaded users can test the beta version of the application and contribute to the official Beta program.

ArcGIS Pro represents a seamless environment for data management, editing and analysis. Users can organise their work into projects and use the geospatial data which is stored locally or access the contents shared via ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS.

ArcGIS Pro comes as a full 64-bit application, which supports multi-threading and has a convenient user interface, which provides users with an instant access to the tools, database connections and allows to quickly switch from a 2D map to a 3-dimensional GIS scene.

Don’t worry if you already have ArcGIS for Desktop installed on your computer; ArcGIS Pro is not intended to replace ArcGIS for Desktop. That’s just another powerful tool that Esri provide you with to get the maximum from your GIS data. You can install ArcGIS Pro Beta on the same machine as ArcGIS for Desktop 10.2.x and run these two software packages in parallel.

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Bringing Your Data from the Cloud Back to Earth – How to extract your data from ArcGIS Online.

In my blog post series so far this year, I have considered and written up common workflows for preparing data for ‘in field’ collection capture using the Collector for ArcGIS app.

If you’ve missed any of these blogs, you can find them using the Collector tag on this page.

So what’s the next step? Well, now that you’ve published the data, and used the Collector app to collect new features and you’re back at the office, you’d probably like to get the data from the “cloud” and do some good old editing or analysis in ArcGIS for Desktop.

This brings us to my current blog post! Here I’ll cover a few simple techniques that you may use to extract the data from a feature service that’s running on ArcGIS Online, and use it in ArcGIS Desktop. To illustrate this workflow I will use the same feature service representing traffic accidents that I’ve used to demonstrate the Collector’s “offline editing” workflows.
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Synchronization with feature services in ArcPad 10.2.1

How to use your ArcGIS Online hosted feature services in ArcPad

The latest version of the popular field data collection tool ArcPad (v.10.2.1) was released by Esri Inc. on the 6th of February. This release includes a few important updates and among the most important ones – a major improvement to the editing and synchronization capabilities. The users of ArcPad 10.2.1 can use feature services published on ArcGIS for Server 10.0 – 10.2 and they can also take advantage of using feature services hosted on the ArcGIS Online for organisations.

One of my clients has recently asked me to demonstrate these new capabilities and test the workflow which would involve editing vector data from a feature service hosted on ArcGIS Online for Organisations in ArcPad. Synchronization was supposed to be the final step if this workflow – the data edited in ArcPad has had to be synchronized with a feature service (i.e. posted back to ArcGIS Online).

The test was successful and the workflow that we’ve implemented can potentially help some of the users who are utilizing ArcPad on Windows Mobile devices connected to GNSS/GPS and who can’t really use the Collector for ArcGIS to connect to the feature services running on ArcGIS online. Now the ArcPad users can also take advantage of using hosted services and use ArcGIS Online for Organisations in their field data collection routines on Windows Mobile operated computers.

I thought it would be worthwhile sharing this workflow with our ArcPad user community….

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LAS2DEM: Creating raster DEMs and DSMs from *.LAS (Lidar) files in ArcGIS 10.2

Imagery and remote sensing has always been one of my areas of interest in GIS. As a support analyst at Esri Australia I get a large number of imagery-related questions and I often help clients learn how to process their geospatial imagery and LiDAR data in ArcGIS.

Lidar (or Light Detection and Ranging) technology has become very popular and accessible in recent years. Because it provides high resolution elevation data, it’s now extensively used in the GIS world for mapping, spatial analysis and 3D visualization.

Although Lidar data can be used in many of the ArcGIS Desktop software,  it turns out that many users are not aware of some basic workflows that can be utilized to extract raster Digital Elevation Models from their LAS point clouds in ArcGIS.

The question “how do I create a DEM from my Lidar data” is one of the most frequently asked questions when it comes to imagery related queries or support incidents.  So I decided to prepare a quick overview of tools and methods that you can use to extract raster surfaces from your Lidar (*.las) files.

Below, I will outline the methods to extract the DEMs (Digital Elevation Model, also referred to as bare earth) and DSMs (Digital Surface Model, which is the first return surface which contains buildings, tree canopy etc.). Let’s get into it!!

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Disconnected editing in Collector for ArcGIS v10.2.2. Part 2: Go offline!

My previous post which can be accessed here has guided you through some of the new features that had been introduced in the new Collector for ArcGIS v 10.2.2 release. The most important function that we considered was the ability to enable the disconnected editing workflow and the previous blog was all about the data preparation stage.

Now that we’ve enabled a web map for offline editing it’s time to test this new functionality in the Collector for ArcGIS app.

Let’s go through some of the major stages of the new disconnected editing workflow in Collector 10.2.2.

1. Open the Collector for ArcGIS app on an iPhone or any other supported mobile device. The map that was created on the DataPrep stage (discussed in the previous post) should be visible in the MyMaps list.

Just to recap: I am still using the scenario with the traffic accidents that I will be capturing in remote areas using the Collector for ArcGIS app.

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